21 Days of Peace

21 Days of Peace

Peace Day LogoThe International Day of Peace is observed annually on September 21 throughout the world. Established in 1981 by unanimous United Nations resolution 36/37, the United Nations General Assembly declared September 21 as a day devoted to “commemorating and strengthening the ideals of peace both within and among all nations and peoples.”

In recognition of the International Day of Peace, Emory University’s Institute for Developing Nations, Emory Campus Life, and The Carter Center Human Rights Program, in collaboration with The U.S. Institute of Peace, present Emory’s 21 Days of Peace.

Emory’s 21 Days of Peace is comprised of a social media campaign and a series of events to promote peace by highlighting the global and local dynamics of peace in our interconnected and interdependent world. Emory’s 21 Days of Peace will educate, inspire, and empower students working for peace both in their local and global communities. 

  • Violence has become normalized in our global culture in our homes and communities, through entertainment and media, and in the ways that power and inequality are articulated locally and globally.  Violence is a threat to the well-being of all and the future of our planet.
  • Violence occurs in many forms, including, but not limited to, physical violence. 
  • Peace involves more than the absence of tension and violence.  Positive peace involves social justice. 
  • Violence at the local level is directly linked to violence in other parts of the world.  For example, anti-immigrant violence in the U.S. is linked to histories of global violence in Central America and the Middle East that have led to present-day violence which is forcing people to leave their homes.
  • Moving from violence to peace involves working to end violence and intentionally laying the groundwork for sustainable, just peace.  This requires individual, community, and state action to address multiple, integrated issues locally and globally.
  • Principles of peacebuilding – being inclusive, treating all parties with dignity, engaged listening and dialogue – apply locally and globally.
  • Building peace within communities is key to sustainable, just peace.  The Carter Center, for example, works with civil society organizations in conflict areas.  Efforts to address diversity, inclusion and violence on campuses involve focused listening, dialogue, and engagement within college communities.  
  • Emory’s 21 Days of Peace will critically engage connections between building peace on a local level -- such as Black Lives Matter, anti-immigrant movements, domestic violence, growing socioeconomic inequality – and building peace globally – such as conflict mediation, mass migration, human trafficking, countering violent extremism.
  • Through a social media campaign linked to the U.S. Institute for Peace’s #PeaceDayChallenge and Emory’s #Emory21DaysofPeace and The Carter Center, we will share information about peacebuilding as well as highlight what individuals and organizations at Emory are doing to build peace locally and globally.

Emory 21 Days of Peace: A Conversation with Jason Carter and Emory University Students

Sept 8, 4pm: Peace Journalism: An Introduction
Moderated discussion with Steven Youngblood, Executive Director, The Center for Global Peace Journalism, Park University and Sheila Tefft, Senior Lecturer, Writing Program, English Department, Emory University.
Location: Jones Room, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Emory University

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Sept 12, 7-8:30pm: Moving from Conflict Mediation to Peacebuilding in the Middle East and West Africa
A panel discussion with experts from The Carter Center’s Conflict Resolution and Human Rights Programs. Hrair Balian, Director, The Conflict Resolution Program at The Carter Center, Tom Crick, Associate Director, The Conflict Resolution Program at The Carter Center, Danielle Taylor Ehioghiren, Program Associate, Human Rights Program, The Carter Center.
Location: The Center for Ethics Commons, Room 102, 1531 Dickey Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322

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Sept 14, 6-8pm: Organizing for Social Change
A student workshop and presentation by the International Human Trafficking Institute of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, Stephanie Sorquira, Associate Program Coordinator, The International Human Trafficking Institute, The National Center for Civil and Human Rights. Ms. Sorquira will make a presentation on Human Trafficking highlighting the global and local connections. She will then lead a workshop on how to organize for social change using the “5 shifts of social change” model. 
Location: Raoul Hall, Emory University Residence Life, 2 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA 30322

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 Emory Free Thought Poetry-Open Mic- Postponed- TBD

Sept 21, 1-2:30pm: Not Just a Response: A Just and Peaceful Response 
A workshop by Professor Greg Ellison, Candler School of Theology, Ed Lee, Emory Campus Life, & James Roland, Emory Campus Life. In a powder keg of national debate, marked by explosive topics like race, class, and gender, far too many conversations about social and political reform are met with relentless condemnation, intolerance, and heated standoffs.  Far too many disagreements are fraught with violence. This workshop provides students the opportunity to investigate how our communities can produce a more just, peaceful and transformative response to ongoing political and social discord on our campus and beyond. 
Location: Rita Ann Rollins Building, Candler School of Theology, Room 421

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Emory 21 Days of Peace FINALE - Sept 21, 4:30-6:30pm
Jason Carter, Partner at Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore and Chair of The Carter Center Board of Trustees,  in conversation with Emory University students, followed by a performance by The Sehwe Village Percussion. Mr. Carter will focus on what we, as individuals and as a community, can do to support peace drawing from his own experiences as a Peace Corps volunteer in South Africa, a political candidate in Georgia, and chair of the Board of Trustees at The Carter Center. Emory students – peace builders – will then present their efforts to advance peace locally and globally.  
Location: Carlos Hall, Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University, 571 South Kilgo Cir NE, Atlanta, GA 30322

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Through a social media campaign linked to the U.S. Institute for Peace’s #PeaceDayChallenge and Emory’s #Emory21DaysofPeace and The Carter Center, we will share information about peacebuilding as well as highlight what individuals and organizations at Emory are doing to build peace locally and globally

  • Post daily on Tweeter or Facebook using #Emory21DaysofPeace and #PeaceDayChallenge
  • Let us know about students, faculty, staff, and campus organizations who are working to advance peace at Emory, in the community, and beyond
  • Join us on Wonderful Wednesday at Emory’s 21 Days of Peace photo booth, answer a peace question, take a picture, and post it on twitter and facebook using #Emory21DaysofPeace and #PeaceDayChallenge
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